Contact Us

Wheaton IL juvenile charges lawyerPrior to 1899, there was no such thing as a juvenile justice system. Illinois was the first state to create a separate court that was solely for juvenile offenders. The juvenile justice system was created with the idea that the majority of children’s behavior can be changed and modified so that they can become law-abiding citizens. Though the juvenile justice system does differ from the adult justice system, juveniles retain many of the same rights as their adult counterparts.

Rights of Juveniles

The state of Illinois recognizes those who are age 17 and younger are juveniles who will be tried in juvenile court -- for most things. Children over the age of 15 can be tried as an adult for very serious crimes. No matter where a child is prosecuted, they have rights. These rights include:

  • Right to Remain Silent: Like adults, your child has the right to not self-incriminate him or herself. Your child is not required to answer any police questioning if you and/or your child’s lawyer are not present.
  • Right to an Attorney: Also like adults, your child has the right to an attorney. If your family cannot afford an attorney, a public defender will be assigned to your child’s case. The public defender assigned to your child’s case will be versed in juvenile law and will have knowledge of how the juvenile justice system works.
  • Right to Talk to a Parent or Guardian: Your child also has the right to talk to you and have you present during questioning. Before your child talks to police, police should be told by the child of the child’s wish to have a parent present, and police should be told by the child how to get a hold of you.
  • Right to Know the Charges: Your child has the right to know with what they are being charged. Police must explain the charges to your child and what crime they believe your child has committed.

Rights of Parents

In addition to children, parents who have a child who has been accused of a crime also have rights. These rights include:

  • Right to Be Notified: If your child has been arrested, you have the right to be informed as quickly as possible of your child’s arrest. Police are required to notify you as soon as your child is arrested or before your child is being questioned.
  • Right to Know Why Your Child is In Police Custody: You have the right to know why your child has been arrested and where they are being held in police custody. Police must also tell you what specific charges are being held against your child.
  • Right to Be With Your Child: As your child’s parent, you have the right to be with your child at all times during questioning. This allows you to ensure that your child’s rights are being protected and that you know what is going on with your child’s case.

Has Your Child Been Arrested? A DuPage County Juvenile Defense Lawyer Can Help

No parent wants to receive the call that their child has run into trouble with the law. At the Davi Law Group, LLC, we understand that juvenile charges can be scary for both the child and the parents. Our skilled Wheaton, IL juvenile defense attorneys will make sure we do everything in our power to protect your child’s rights and innocence. If your child is facing criminal charges, call us today at 630-580-6373 to schedule a free consultation.

...
Continue reading

Wheaton IL traffic violation lawyerWith the rise of technology, almost everyone has a computer in their pocket these days -- their cell phones. While these handy devices can make life easier for us, they have also proven to make life more dangerous. In an effort to prevent drivers from using their electronic devices while driving, a new Illinois law that will take effect in July will increase the consequences that drivers will face when caught using an electronic device while driving. This new law will make a first-time offense of using an electronic device while driving a moving violation, rather than just a warning.

New Law Changes Penalties for First-Time Offenders

Before the new law was enacted, the Illinois Vehicle Code stated that drivers needed to be caught using an electronic device while driving at least twice before any disciplinary action would be taken against them. Under the new law, drivers only need to be caught using an electronic device once before they are issued a ticket for a moving violation. Beginning in July of this year, first-time offenders who use an electronic device while driving will see the infraction on their driving record. If drivers commit the offense more than three times in a 12-month period, they will face a driver’s license suspension. In addition to the violations, they will also face fines as follows:

  • First offense: $75
  • Second offense: $100
  • Third offense: $125
  • Fourth or subsequent offense: $150

Scope of the Problem

Though various governments and state police officers across the nation have been cracking down on distracted driving, it still remains an issue. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 3,450 people were killed as a result of distracted driving in 2016, and nearly 400,000 people were injured by distracted driving accidents in 2015. The handheld use of electronic devices has decreased, but the NHTSA states that using an electronic device in any way while driving increases your risk of crashing by 3.6 times.

Contact a DuPage County Traffic Violations Attorney

Though a first-time offense of driving while using an electronic device is now a moving violation, it can easily become a misdemeanor or felony if you cause someone else great bodily harm or death because of a crash. At the Davi Law Group, LLC, we understand the gravity of distracted driving violations. Our skilled Wheaton, IL traffic violations lawyers can help you form a solid defense against any traffic charges you may face. Call our office today at 630-580-6373 to schedule a free consultation.

...
Continue reading

DuPage County criminal defense lawyerWhether you are in court for a civil or criminal matter, or you are the plaintiff or defendant, you are expected to act a certain way and adhere to certain rules when you are in the courthouse. Every time you appear in court, you are being watched and analyzed. The judge, opposing counsel and the jury are examining you and determining what kind of person you are and if you have any credibility. Your actions and behavior in court could either favorably or unfavorably affect your case outcome. Here are a few tips to help you succeed and act appropriately when you go to court:

1. Make Sure You Arrive Early

You should make sure you factor in enough time for you to get to the courthouse on time. Account for possible traffic, in addition to the time it will take you to go through the security screening at the courthouse. Make sure you arrive at least 30 minutes before your scheduled hearing.

2. Dress For Success

When you go to court, all eyes will be on you. The general rule of thumb is that you should dress professionally and conservatively. Men should wear slacks or dress pants, a button-down shirt, a tie and a jacket or sweater. Women should wear a dress or slacks and a blouse. Women should be especially careful not to wear anything too revealing. Both men and women should be sure to groom themselves appropriately.

3. Be Respectful

Respect can take you a long way. When the judge is talking to you or asking you a question, make sure you are looking at the judge and making eye contact. Never interrupt the judge while he or she is speaking and always wait for the judge to finish their question before you answer. If you need to address the judge, always refer to them as “your honor.”

...
Continue reading

DuPage County domestic violence charges defense lawyerDomestic violence is a crime that Illinois courts take very seriously. Even if you did not actually commit the act of domestic violence, these charges can be detrimental to your life and your reputation. If you have an order of protection against you, it could make your life extremely difficult. There are many things that an Illinois order of protection can order you to do or prohibit you from doing. It is important to understand what orders of protection mean for you if you are facing Illinois domestic violence charges.

What is Domestic Violence?

According to the Illinois Domestic Violence Act of 1986, domestic violence is when any family or household member commits any act of abuse toward another family or household member. Family or household members include:

  • Spouses or former spouses;
  • Parents, children and stepchildren;
  • Former or current housemates;
  • Former or current dating or engaged couples;
  • People with a child in common; and
  • People with disabilities and their caregivers.

Acts of abuse include:

  • Physical abuse, such as hitting, pushing, shoving, biting or others;
  • Harassment, such as following you, creating disturbances at your school or work, or preventing you from seeing your child;
  • Forcing you to do something you do not want to do; or
  • Forcing you to have sex.

Effects of Orders of Protection

If an order of protection is entered against you, there are certain things that the order can require you to do and prohibit you from doing. These things can include:

...
Continue reading

Wheaton IL weapons charges attorney.jpgIn the state of Illinois, if you are in possession of a firearm, you must also be in possession of an Illinois firearm ownership identification card (FOID). It is illegal for you to own or be in possession of a firearm without a FOID card. Though the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution gives citizens the right to bear arms, the Illinois State Police reserves the right to revoke or suspend your FOID card at any time if you violate ownership rules or if you become ineligible for a FOID card. Having your FOID card suspended or revoked comes with a laundry list of things you must do to comply with the suspension or revocation, and if you do not comply with those requirements, you could be facing serious charges.

Notice of Revocation

There is a multitude of reasons that your FOID card can be revoked. Some of those reasons include:

  • You were convicted of a misdemeanor other than a traffic offense, and you are under the age of 21;
  • You were convicted of a felony;
  • You are addicted to narcotics; and
  • You were convicted of domestic battery after 2012.

If your FOID card is revoked, you will be notified in writing by the Illinois State Police. The notice will go into detail as to why your card has been revoked. The notice will also include a list of the requirements you must comply with.

Revocation Requirements

Once you have received your revocation notice, you have 48 hours to complete the requirements that you were given. First, you have to surrender your FOID card to your local law enforcement agency. You will receive a receipt that you have surrendered your card, and your local agency will send your card to the state police.

...
Continue reading
Abraham Lincoln A lawyer’s time and advice are his stock and trade. -Abraham Lincoln
Warrenville Office
Address28371 Davis Parkway, Suite 103, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone(630) 657-5052
Fax(888) 350-9195
Wheaton Office
Address1776 S. Naperville Road, Building A, Suite 105, Wheaton, IL 60189
Phone(630) 580-6373
Fax(888) 350-9195
Chicago Office
Address321 N. Clark Street, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60654
Phone(312) 985-5676
Fax(888) 350-9195
Joliet Office
Address58 N. Chicago Street, 7th Floor,
Joliet, IL 60432
Phone(815) 582-4901
Fax(888) 350-9195
Davi Law Group, LLC handles criminal law matters for clients in Chicago and throughout the western suburbs including DuPage County, Will County, Kane County, Kendall County and Cook County and the cities of Aurora, Bloomingdale, Bolingbrook, Carol Stream, Darien, Downers Grove, Elmhurst, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Hinsdale, Joliet, Kendall County, Lisle, Lombard, Naperville, Oak Park, Oak Brook, Oswego, Park Ridge, Roselle, St. Charles, Villa Park, Warrenville, Wheaton, Winfield, Woodridge and Yorkville.

 

 

 

Chat Us Text Us