Contact Us
We are open for business and offering phone and video consultations during business hours.

Category Archives: Criminal Law

DuPage County marijuana possession lawyerIllinois became the 11th state to legalize the recreational sale and use of marijuana and marijuana products Friday. This was a historic moment in United States history, as Illinois passed the bill that permits both usage and sales of recreational cannabis entirely through legislation, rather than a voter referendum. The new law significantly alters how the state will handle cannabis. It will now treat it and tax it similarly to the way the state handles alcohol. Though recreational marijuana will be legal in Illinois, there are still rules that you must follow, otherwise, you face penalties.

When and Where Can I Buy Recreational Marijuana?

Beginning in January 2020, recreational marijuana will be available for purchase by any citizen over the age of 21 at any of the 20 medical marijuana dispensaries throughout the state. By mid-2020, additional licenses will be given to other recreational stores, processors and cultivators, though local governments have the power to decide whether recreational marijuana businesses operate in their area.

How Much Can I Buy/Possess?

Citizens are permitted to possess up to 30 grams of dry marijuana flower, which equates to around one ounce, or as much as can fit into an adult’s cupped hands. Citizens are also permitted to possess up to five grams of cannabis concentrate and up to 500 milligrams of THC in cannabis-infused products, such as tinctures or edibles. Visitors to Illinois are permitted to possess half of those amounts.

Where Can I Consume Marijuana?

You are permitted to consume cannabis in private residences or in some cannabis-related businesses. You are not permitted to consume cannabis if you are in a public place, including streets or parks, in a motor vehicle, on school grounds (unless you are a medical marijuana user) or around anyone who is under the age of 21.

...
Continue reading

DuPage County reckless driving charges attorneyThere are scores of traffic violations you can commit from behind the wheel -- speeding, running a stop sign, not using your blinkers -- the list goes on. One of the more serious traffic offenses you can commit is reckless driving. In Illinois, reckless driving can result in significant consequences, because reckless driving is not just a traffic ticket -- it can result in a misdemeanor or a felony charge, depending on your circumstances. If you have been charged with reckless driving, it is important that you understand the charges and related penalties.

What is Reckless Driving?

According to Illinois traffic laws, reckless driving occurs when a person either:

  • Drives any vehicle with a willful or wanton disregard for the safety of people or property; or
  • Knowingly drives a vehicle and uses an incline in a roadway -- such as a railroad crossing, bridge approach or hill -- to cause the vehicle to become airborne.

There is no one particular action that can get you charged with reckless driving in Illinois. Rather, it is up to the discretion of the arresting law enforcement officer and judge (and possibly a jury) to determine whether your actions on the road constitute reckless driving. 

Consequences for Reckless Driving

In its most basic form, reckless driving is charged as a Class A misdemeanor, the most serious class of misdemeanor. This means a reckless driving charge can result in up to one year in jail and up to $2,500 in fines.

...
Continue reading

DuPage County probation attorneyWhen you find yourself in trouble with the law, there are dozens of outcomes that could arise from an arrest and conviction. Most of the time, the biggest fear offenders have is going to jail, but not all crimes carry prison sentences. Even if you are convicted of a crime that carries prison time, you will not necessarily be sentenced to prison time. 

One of the more favorable outcomes of any criminal conviction is probation. Probation is typically used as an alternative to a prison sentence, allowing the offender to proceed with their normal life -- with a few exceptions. There are certain things that the state of Illinois requires those who are sentenced with probation to do and certain things that are prohibited during the probationary period.

Prohibited Actions During Probation

For the most part, the things that you are forbidden from doing during your probation sentence depend on the type of crime you committed and what the judge believes is appropriate to prohibit you from doing. All offenders who are on probation are not permitted to leave the state without the court’s permission, violate any criminal statute anywhere or possess a firearm if your crime was a felony or a misdemeanor that involved the intentional infliction of bodily harm.

In addition, you could have other restrictions during your probationary period based off of your original crime. For example, a person who is convicted of drug possession or distribution may be ordered to not have any amount of a controlled substance in their system at any time. A person who is convicted of domestic violence and has a record of violent behavior when they are drinking may be ordered not to drink or have any amount of alcohol in their system.

...
Continue reading

DuPage County aggravated speeding lawyerIn recent years, the state of Illinois has cracked down on speeding. According to the Illinois Department of Transportation, there were over 24,000 speeding citations recorded in 2015. Though speeding is often only a traffic ticket that comes with a fine, there are situations in which a speeding infraction can result in jail time and extensive fines. Though some people may think speeding is a victimless crime, it is not. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 10,000 people were killed due to speeding-related traffic accidents in 2017.

Illinois Aggravated Speeding Laws

According to the Illinois Vehicle Code, speeding 26 miles per hour or more over the posted speed limit is considered to be aggravated speeding. This is technically a criminal charge, rather than a traffic violation, which is why the potential consequences for aggravated speeding are more serious than just a fine.

26 mph to 34 mph over the speed limit: If you are caught driving 26 mph over the posted speed limit, but not more than 35 mph over the speed limit, you will be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. This means you could face up to six months in jail, up to two years of probation and up to $1,500 in fines.

35 mph or more over the speed limit: If you are caught driving more than 35 mph over the posted speed limit, you are committing a Class A misdemeanor. This charge carries a possible sentence of up to one year in jail, up to two years of probation and up to $2,500 in fines. If you are facing a speeding charge, a judge can also order that you complete community service or that you attend traffic school.

...
Continue reading

DuPage County criminal defense lawyerWhether you are in court for a civil or criminal matter, or you are the plaintiff or defendant, you are expected to act a certain way and adhere to certain rules when you are in the courthouse. Every time you appear in court, you are being watched and analyzed. The judge, opposing counsel and the jury are examining you and determining what kind of person you are and if you have any credibility. Your actions and behavior in court could either favorably or unfavorably affect your case outcome. Here are a few tips to help you succeed and act appropriately when you go to court:

1. Make Sure You Arrive Early

You should make sure you factor in enough time for you to get to the courthouse on time. Account for possible traffic, in addition to the time it will take you to go through the security screening at the courthouse. Make sure you arrive at least 30 minutes before your scheduled hearing.

2. Dress For Success

When you go to court, all eyes will be on you. The general rule of thumb is that you should dress professionally and conservatively. Men should wear slacks or dress pants, a button-down shirt, a tie and a jacket or sweater. Women should wear a dress or slacks and a blouse. Women should be especially careful not to wear anything too revealing. Both men and women should be sure to groom themselves appropriately.

3. Be Respectful

Respect can take you a long way. When the judge is talking to you or asking you a question, make sure you are looking at the judge and making eye contact. Never interrupt the judge while he or she is speaking and always wait for the judge to finish their question before you answer. If you need to address the judge, always refer to them as “your honor.”

...
Continue reading
Abraham Lincoln A lawyer’s time and advice are his stock and trade. -Abraham Lincoln
Warrenville Office
Address28371 Davis Parkway, Suite 103, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone(630) 657-5052
Fax(888) 350-9195
Wheaton Office
Address1776 S. Naperville Road, Building A, Suite 105, Wheaton, IL 60189
Phone(630) 580-6373
Fax(888) 350-9195
Chicago Office
Address321 N. Clark Street, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60654
Phone(312) 985-5676
Fax(888) 350-9195
Joliet Office
Address58 N. Chicago Street, Suite 102,
Joliet, IL 60432
Phone(815) 582-4901
Fax(888) 350-9195
Davi Law Group, LLC handles criminal law matters for clients in Chicago and throughout the western suburbs including DuPage County, Will County, Kane County, Kendall County and Cook County and the cities of Aurora, Bloomingdale, Bolingbrook, Carol Stream, Darien, Downers Grove, Elmhurst, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Hinsdale, Joliet, Kendall County, Lisle, Lombard, Naperville, Oak Park, Oak Brook, Oswego, Park Ridge, Roselle, St. Charles, Villa Park, Warrenville, Wheaton, Winfield, Woodridge and Yorkville.

 

 

 

Chat Us Text Us